JOBKEEPER PAYMENT & DIRECTION KNOWLEDGE BASE

JobKeeper 1.0

On 30 March 2020, the Federal Government announced a round of support for employers and their employees with the introduction of a JobKeeper Payment, as a subsidy to help businesses impacted by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic in keeping people employed.

Eligible employers will be able to claim a fortnightly payment of $1,500 per eligible employee from 30 March 2020, for a maximum period of 6 months.

When legislation to support this was passed by the Federal Government on 8 April 2020, further amendments were also made to address inflexibility within the Fair Work Act and has enabled employers with unprecedented powers to vary employment terms on a unilateral basis in order to reasonably manage their business and workforce during this period.

 

JobKeeper 2.0

On 22 July 2020, The Australian Government extended the JobKeeper Payment for a further 6 months to March 2021 (JobKeeper 2.0). Ongoing support under JobKeeper 2.0 will be targeted to businesses and not-for-profits that continue to be significantly impacted by the economic effect of COVID-19.

Eligible employers for JobKeeper 2.0 will be able to claim a fortnightly payment of $1,200 per eligible employee from 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021 and $1,000 per eligible employee from 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021. However, this will be limited to employees who worked an average of 20 hours or more per week in either February or June 2020 (whichever period the employee worked more hours).

For all other employees (and business participants) the fortnightly payment will be reduced to $750 from 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021 and $650 from 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021.

On 3 September 2020, the Fair Work Act flexibilities were extended for the duration of JobKeeper 2.0 for eligible employers – but with some key changes.

In the below video, Alana Giddy (Head of HR) talks through the recently announced changes to the JobKeeper Scheme extension

 

Alana Giddy talking through the recently announced changes to the JobKeeper Scheme extension

 

 

Table of Contents – JobKeeper Payment & Direction Knowledge Base

Eligible Employers for the JobKeeper Payment & Directions

Eligible Employees for the JobKeeper Payment

Eligible Business Participants for the JobKeeper Payment

JobKeeper Direction

Legacy Employers & JobKeeper Directions

JobKeeper Payment FAQs

JobKeeper Direction FAQs

JobKeeper Payment & Direction resources

Key dates for the JobKeeper scheme

 

Join Shane Duffy, Simon Obee & Alex Zinzopoulos at 2:00 pm on Wednesday 23 September for our webinar on "What The New JobKeeper 2.0 Eligibility Means For Your Business".

Eligible Employers for the JobKeeper Payment & Directions

Employers will be eligible for the subsidy and directions if:

  • their business has a turnover of less than $1 billion and their turnover has fallen by more than 30%; or
  • their business has a turnover of $1 billion or more and their turnover has fallen by more than 50%; and
  • the business is not subject to the Major Bank Levy.

 

Further consideration has been given to charities registered with the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission (ACNC) and they will be eligible for the subsidy if they estimate their turnover has or will likely fall by 15% or more relative to a comparable period.

Under the original JobKeeper 1.0 arrangement up to 27 September 2020, to establish that a business has met the above criteria, they will be expected to establish that their actual or predicted turnover has fallen in the relevant month or 3 months (depending on the natural activity statement reporting period of that business) relative to their turnover a year earlier.

The Tax Commissioner will have the discretion to set out alternative tests that would establish eligibility in specific circumstances.

Under the revised JobKeeper 2.0 criteria, eligible businesses and not-for-profits will be required to reassess their eligibility with reference to their actual GST turnover in the September quarter of 2020 to demonstrate that they have met the relevant decline in the turnover test to be eligible for the JobKeeper Payment from 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021.

Whilst the Tax Commissioner will still have the discretion to set out alternative tests that would establish eligibility in specific circumstances, it is expected that this will be more strictly applied.

From 4 January 2021, businesses and not-for-profits will need to further reassess their turnover to be eligible for ongoing eligibility to JobKeeper 2.0. They will need to demonstrate that they have met the relevant decline in the turnover test with reference to their actual GST turnover in both the September and December quarters 2020 to remain eligible from 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021.

Treasury has indicated that 920,000 organisations have accessed JobKeeper since its introduction with 3.5 million workers (or 30% of pre-COVID-19 private sector employment) covered by JobKeeper.

Treasury has predicted that 2.1 million workers (60% of those currently covered by JobKeeper) will exit JobKeeper post-September (leaving only 1.4 million workers on JobKeeper 2.0).

 

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Eligible Employees for the JobKeeper Payment

Eligible employees are employees who:

  • are currently employed by the eligible employer (including those stood down or re-hired);
  • were employed by the employer at 1 July 2020 (initially 1 March 2020 however this was revised on the 7 August 2020);
  • are full-time, part-time, or long-term casuals (a casual employed on a regular basis for longer than 12 months as at 1 July 2020);
  • are at least 16 years of age (employees who are 16 or 17 years of age are not eligible for JobKeeper if they are undertaking full-time study or not living independently);
  • are an Australian citizen, the holder of a permanent visa, a Protected Special Category Visa Holder, a non-protected Special Category Visa Holder who has been residing continually in Australia for 10 years or more, or a Special Category (Subclass 444) Visa Holder; and
  • are not in receipt of a JobKeeper Payment from another employer.

 

Not sure where to start? Download our Payroll Guide To The JobKeeper Payment.

Download the free Payroll Guide To The JobKeeper Payment by Employment Innovations

 

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Eligible Business Participants for the JobKeeper Payment

An individual may also be entitled to be included if they:

  • were not employed by the eligible employer;
  • are either a sole trader, partner, beneficiary or director of the eligible business;
  • are at least 16 years of age;
  • are an Australian citizen, the holder of a permanent visa, a Protected Special Category Visa Holder, a non-protected Special Category Visa Holder who has been residing continually in Australia for 10 years or more, or a Special Category (Subclass 444) Visa Holder; and
  • are not in receipt of a JobKeeper Payment from another employer.

 

The individual cannot be an employee (other than a casual employee) of any other entity. Each eligible employer is only able to nominate one business participant, even if multiple individuals qualify.

 

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JobKeeper Direction

Any employer who qualifies for the JobKeeper Payment subsidy will also be able to give a JobKeeper Direction to an employee which have the effect of varying the employee’s terms of employment on a unilateral basis.

This can include a broad discretion in relation to hours of work, timing of work, location of work and the allocation of work tasks. Up until the 28 September 2020, a direction can also be made to an eligible employee in relation to the taking of annual leave.

Importantly, JobKeeper directions will prevail over any existing employment terms under a contract, award, or enterprise agreement.

 

Need to know more? Why not read our Guide to giving JobKeeper Enabling Directions or you can download our free JobKeeper 2.0 Templates to use within your business.

Download Employment Innovations' free JobKeeper 2.0 template resources

 

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Legacy Employers & JobKeeper Directions

A legacy employer is an employer who:

  • was entitled to one or more JobKeeper payments for an eligible employee before 28 September 2020, and
  • does not qualify for JobKeeper payments for the eligible employee on or after 28 September 2020.

 

From 28 September 2020, legacy employers that hold a certificate from an accountant (or another authorised person*) stating that they have experienced at least a 10% decline in turnover can give modified JobKeeper enabling directions or make agreements with employees.

* There is an exemption for small businesses with less than 15 employees who can provide a statutory declaration of the decline in turnover, rather than provide a certificate.

 

The following eligibility criteria applies:

  1. To use JobKeeper flexibilities between 28 September 2020 27 October 2020, a legacy employer must have a 10% decline in turnover for the June 2020 quarter (April, May and June 2020) compared to the June 2019 quarter.
  2. To use JobKeeper flexibilities between 28 October 2020 and 27 February 2021, a legacy employer must have a 10% decline in turnover for the September 2020 quarter (July, August and September 2020) compared to the September 2019 quarter.
  3. To use JobKeeper flexibilities between 28 February 2021 and 28 March 2021, a legacy employer must have a 10% decline in turnover for the December 2020 quarter (October, November and December 2020) compared to the December 2019 quarter.

 

A legacy employer must obtain a new decline in turnover certificate prior to each of the periods stated above in order to use any of the flexibilities.

Legacy employers will be able to utilise a more reduced set of measures than before, including limitations around the extent to which a JobKeeper Direction can reduce an employee’s hours of work and requiring a longer period of notice (7 days) before changes can take effect.

The maximum reduction in hours that can be direction is to 60% of the ordinary hours the employee worked as of 1 March 2020.

Where a JobKeeper direction has been given, legacy employers are under a duty to update employees about whether they continue to satisfy the 10% decline turnover test in the periods set out above.

In other words, if (for example) a legacy employer obtains a 10% decline in turnover certificate and gives a JobKeeper enabling stand down direction to commence on 28 September 2020, it would need to obtain further certificates prior to 28 October 2020 and 28 February 2021. It would also need to update employees in writing prior to these dates that it had obtained the certificates and the direction was continuing.

If a legacy employer ceases to satisfy the decline in the turnover test for either of the periods commencing 28 October 2020 or 28 February 2020, it must also notify the employees in writing.

 

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JobKeeper Payment FAQs

Simply click on each frequently asked questions below in order to expand and view the answer.

Q. What is the difference between JobKeeper and JobSeeker Payments?

A. JobKeeper Payments are administered by employers and the ATO for eligible employees. JobSeeker is provided by Services Australia directly with individuals who are without work, or have had their income impacted.

Q. How do I apply as an eligible employer?

A. Employers can use their MyGovID account to access the ATO Business Portal to register their business on or after the 20 April 2020.

The Australian Tax Office (ATO) deadline for applying into the scheme from the first fortnight commencing 30 March 2020 has been extended to 31 May 2020. Eligible employers can enter the JobKeeper scheme at any stage after that.

Q. What if our business has changed hands during the last 12 months?

A. The ATO may need to consider an alternative test to determine employer eligibility for the JobKeeper Payment in regard to turnover.

For employees who were employed by the previous owner and transferred employment to the new owner, prior service will count as far as their eligibility is concerned.

Q. How do I determine if my casuals are employed on a “regular and systematic” basis?

A. A casual is likely to be considered “regular and systematic” if they have had a recurring work schedule or a reasonable expectation of ongoing work. Hours may vary from week to week and it can still be deemed “regular and systematic”.

Also, breaks in service such as for seasonal workers may also NOT disqualify an employee from this definition as the employer’s system requires them to work in that fashion. You would likely have to demonstrate that there is an expectation of ongoing work.

Q. What are my obligations to employees subject to the subsidy?

A. You will need to notify your eligible employees that you will be claiming the JobKeeper Payment. You will also need to provide your eligible employees with a JobKeeper Employee Nomination Notice (ATO Form) and they are required to complete and return this to you. Participating employers will be required to ensure eligible employees will receive, at a minimum, the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount, before tax.

Employers have been granted the flexibility to ensure any payment to eligible employees from 30 March 2020 can be made up until 8 May 2020 (*extended from 30 April 2020). If you make payments after this date you will not be eligible for the JobKeeper Payment for that employee for the first 2 fortnights of the scheme.

After this period, employers are required to pay employees in accordance with their normal pay cycle, at least the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount, or the equivalent of this if the pay period is weekly or monthly.

For the fortnights commencing on 3 August 2020 and 17 August 2020, the ATO granted employers a further extension up until 31 August 2020 to meet the wage condition for all new eligible employees included in the JobKeeper scheme under the 1 July eligibility test.

Q. What if I have employees who have been stood down without pay?

A. You have the option to register and process the JobKeeper Payment to employees stood down from work without pay. However, eligible employers will not receive the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per eligible employee per fortnight until the first week of May 2020. This can include backdated payments to cover the period commencing from 30 March 2020.

Employers are required to make payments to eligible stood down employees throughout April (i.e. before the employer has in fact received any payment from the Government), however, it is also possible to backpay the employees from when the scheme commenced on 30 March 2020.

Eligible employers will continue to report monthly to the ATO in order to receive the subsidy for the previous month.

Q. How will the ATO determinate if I have paid my eligible employees and when will the employer be reimbursed?

A. The ATO will be relying on Single Touch Payroll (STP) information to validate eligible employees and ensure they have been paid by the employer. If you do not use a STP compliant payroll solution, the ATO will accept manual reporting via their portal.

Whilst the ATO have made statements confirming that the first payment will be made in the first week of May, the legislation states that the ATO has up to 14 days after the completion of each monthly period to make JobKeeper Payments to eligible employers for the previous month.

Q. How much will I be reimbursed?

A. The JobKeeper Payment from 30 March 2020 to 27 September 2020 will be limited to $1,500 per eligible employee and/or business participant each fortnight.

The JobKeeper Payment from 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021 will be paid at two different rates for eligible employers. A fortnightly payment of $1,200 per eligible employee who during the month of June or February 2020 (whichever is greater) worked in excess of an average of 20 hours per week and for all other employees (and business participants) the fortnightly payment will be $750.

The JobKeeper Payment from 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021 will then be reduced to $1,000 and $650 respectively, per fortnight, for employers who continue to be eligible.

Q. What if I as the employer (or my employee) is deemed ineligible for JobKeeper Payment and I have topped up wages to the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per fortnight prior periods?

A. It may be possible to treat these additional payments as overpayment errors – as you have mistakenly paid something that the employee was not entitled to. Employers are not permitted to take money out of an employee’s pay to fix up a mistake or overpayment.

Instead, the employer and employee should discuss and agree on a repayment arrangement.

Q. Am I obliged to register if I am an eligible employer?

A. No. It may not be practicable for your business to commit to the above obligations.

Q. Is the JobKeeper Payment to employees taxable?

A. Yes.

Q. Are we required to pay superannuation in addition to the JobKeeper Payment?

A. Superannuation is not required to be paid for the amount supplemented by the Government if the employee is not working. If the JobKeeper Payment is supplementing a salary or wages for work performed, super is payable on the salary or wages – as it would normally be.

Q. If an eligible employee is on any form of paid leave do I still receive the full subsidy for the employee?

A. Yes. However, if an eligible employee is receiving paid leave such as Parental Leave or Dad & Partner Pay in the fortnightly period they are ineligible for the JobKeeper Payment in that fortnightly period.

Q. Does the calculation of the minimum JobKeeper amount to be paid to employees include payments for leave?

A. Yes – so long as the employee is paid at least the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per fortnight, through leave payments, overtime payments, allowances, etc the employer will have met their obligation.

Q. Are eligible employees currently unable to work and on workers compensation eligible for JobKeeper Payment?

A. No. If an eligible employee is totally incapacitated and is in recept of workers compensation payments in the fortnightly period they are ineligible for the JobKeeper Payment in that fortnightly period.

Q. Can I re-hire an eligible employee who was employed at 1 March 2020 (or 1 July 2020) that I terminated since?

A. Yes. The scheme is designed to encourage employers to re-hire employees that may have been terminated, such as those made redundant.

This can only be done with mutual agreement with the employee – and this can be on any terms that are deemed satisfactory to both parties (including pay, role, etc.). The parties may also need to agree on terms requiring the repayment of any termination pay.

Q. If I have eligible employees earning less than the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount in a fortnight, before tax, should I be topping the employee’s pay up, before tax under this arrangement?

A. Yes. However, the top-up amount will not be subject to superannuation.

Q. If I have eligible employees earning less than the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per fortnight, before tax, can I increase their hours to match the minimum payment?

A. It is always open to you to request that employees increase their number of hours. If employees agree, then the situation should be relatively straight-forward. 

Some modern awards provide specific rules about the rights of employers to increase employees’ hours, and these should be checked carefully. In addition, the JobKeeper amendments to the Fair Work Act 2009 provide a mechanism for employers to request that employees perform their work at different times to usual, and provide that employees can only refuse this request where it is reasonable to do so.

In cases before the Fair Work Commission, there is some suggestion that this mechanism can be used to compel employees (including casual employees) to work increased hours (unless they have a reasonable ground to refuse). Given the uncertainty in this area, we would recommend employers seek professional advice.

Q. If a casual employee was not entitled to JobKeeper 1.0 due to having less than 12 months service at the 1 March 2020, but has now worked the minimum 12 months as at 1 July 2020, are they eligible?

A. Yes. If they have continued to be employed on a regular and systematic basis then they will be eligible.

Q. What if my employees are refusing to work and assume they will be paid the JobKeeper Payment even if they are not working?

A. Employees who do not follow a reasonable and lawful instruction from their employer to work or who are unable to provide a satisfactory reason as to why they cannot perform work (such as personal leave) can be disciplined up to termination of employment. Seek professional advice if considering such actions.

Q. Can I ask my casual employee on JobKeeper to work fewer hours as a result of changes to the JobKeeper Payment subsidy?

A. Yes. You are able to (informally) request the casual employee to work whatever hours the business requires. We would recommend being as open and as consultative as possible with the employee. If you explain to the employee why you need them to work the additional hours (e.g. for the future viability of the business, which will help secure their job) then it would be hoped that they would be agreeable to this. 

There is also currently an ability under the JobKeeper amendments to the Fair Work Act 2009 to enable the employer to (formally) request an employee to work different hours and times to their ordinary hours, and employees must comply with the request unless it is unreasonable to do so. It is not entirely clear whether this request can be used to increase an employee’s ordinary hours.

Ultimately if a casual employee refuses to work any shifts it may be possible to terminate their employment. We would suggest that you contact Employment Innovations for advice on your individual circumstances.

Q. Can an employer terminate the employment of a casual worker on JobKeeper without a tangible reason? If so, how does one go about it? Is it the same as before JobKeeper?

A. The position for terminating the employment of a casual employee would be the same as before JobKeeper.

Remember that long-term casual employees have a right to claim unfair dismissal so that it would be advisable to follow a formal procedure before terminating employment to reduce the risk of any claims. Please contact Employment Innovations if you require advice on the process to follow.

Q. If employees have already agreed to a reduction in pay prior to the introduction of JobKeeper is there a requirement to return to their original pay rate?

A. No. The only requirement is that the employee is earning at least the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per fortnight. But it may be fair and equitable to review these arrangements in consideration of the JobKeeper Payment.

Q. What happens if our business continues to further decline and we wish to make an eligible employee redundant. Can we do this if they are receiving the JobKeeper Payment?

A. Yes. But the employee will only be eligible for JobKeeper up until their termination.

Q. If an employee is on paid leave during February or June 2020 does that count towards their hours worked? What about unpaid leave?

A. It is expected to be confirmed that paid leave counts towards hours worked in February and June 2020 and that there will be discretion applied in circumstances where unpaid leave was taken in either period, e.g. for an emergency response to the bushfires in February.

Q. When do JobKeeper Payments cease?

A. Current JobKeeper Payments will cease on 27 September 2020 to eligible employers who have successfully applied for JobKeeper up until this date.

The second round of JobKeeper Payments will run from 28 September 2020 to 3 January 2021 to eligible employers who have met the minimum decline in the turnover test for the previous quarter.

The third round of JobKeeper Payments will run from 4 January 2021 to 28 March 2021 to eligible employers who have met the minimum decline in the turnover test for the previous 3 quarters.

Q. How much notice should an employer provide to an employee that they will no longer be eligible for JobKeeper post-September?

A. While there are no specific rules regarding this, best practice would be to give employees as much notice as possible.

JobKeeper Direction FAQs

Simply click on each frequently asked questions below in order to expand and view the answer.

Q. Which employees am I able to make JobKeeper Direction in relation to?

A. All employees that you receive the JobKeeper payment in relation to.

Legacy employers and their employees (i.e. those who were entitled to JobKeeper Payments before 28 September 2020 and do not qualify at any stage afterwards) will be able to utilise a reduced set of JobKeeper Directions for those employees only up until 28 March 2021 so long as you satisfy a 10% turnover decline test.

Q. Can I reduce the hourly rate of pay for my employee under a JobKeeper Direction?

A. No. The employee’s rate of pay cannot be reduced, for the hours which they actually work once a direction has been given.

Q. Can I reduce or change the hours that an employee works under a JobKeeper Direction?

A. Yes. You can give an “enabling stand down direction” to work fewer hours or days when they cannot be usefully employed for their normal hours due to business changes caused by the pandemic or government initiatives.

Legacy employers who satisfy a 10% turnover decline are only permitted to reduce the hours of an employee to a minimum of 60% of their ordinary hours as they were on 1 March 2020.

Employees will not be entitled to be paid for the times where they are not working, subject to the rule that they must be paid at least the applicable JobKeeper Payment amount per fortnight, before tax.

Employees and employers under JobKeeper (including legacy employers) will also be able, “despite any limitations in a designated employment provision” (e.g. an award) to come to an agreement about working different days and times outside of ordinary hours.

Legacy employers who satisfy a 10% turnover decline must ensure that an employee is to work a minimum of two (2) consecutive hours each day.

Q. Can I direct an employee to perform different duties or perform work in a different location?

A. Yes. You can direct employees to undertake different duties and perform work in a different location (including work from home), so long as the directions are reasonable, safe and within the employee’s ability.

Q. How do I go about enforcing a JobKeeper Direction?

A. Employees must be consulted with about any proposed changes and employees must be given a  written direction of the changes with at least 3 days’ notice.

Legacy employers who satisfy a 10% turnover decline must provide a longer period of notice before giving a JobKeeper enabling direction – 7 days rather than 3 days, and have expanded consultation requirements.

Q. What is considered a “reasonable” JobKeeper Direction?

A. The employer can only give a direction if the affected employee cannot usefully be employed for their normal hours and normal activities during the period of the direction. The direction must ensure work can be performed safely, and within the employee’s skills and competencies.

Q. Does a JobKeeper Direction include forcing an employee to take annual leave?

A. Yes, but only up until 28 September 2020. Employers are able to request JobKeeper employees take annual leave (even when they are stood down), so long as they have at least two weeks leave remaining. Employees can only refuse the request on reasonable grounds. 

It would be possible to request employees to take a period of annual leave per fortnight that the JobKeeper subsidy could be used to subsidise. To simplify this process, you may find our downloadable JobKeeper Enabling Direction Letter templates helpful.

Employees and employers under JobKeeper will also be able, “despite any limitations in a designated employment provision” to come to an agreement about taking double the amount of annual leave, paid at half pay.

Q. What if the employee doesn’t agree to take annual leave while receiving JobKeeper payment?

A. If the employee unreasonably refuses the request, an application can be made to the Fair Work Commission to compel the employee to take annual leave.

Q. What happens to accrual rules if an employee has any employment arrangements changed under these new rules?

A. The employee continues to accrue as if no direction or agreement has been made under these new rules.

Q. What happens when employees have had their arrangements changed by a JobKeeper Direction (for example, reduction of hours) and they take leave, such as annual leave or personal/carer’s leave?

A. Leave operates as if there was no JobKeeper direction in place, i.e. if a full-time employee has had their days reduced to one day per week and they take a week of leave, they will still be paid for a full week.

Q. Can I issue a stand down on a public holiday that an employee would normally have been absent from work and paid?

A. No. This means that an employee should still be paid for any public holidays as normal if they would have been absent from work and paid prior to the stand down.

The JobKeeper Payment can subsidise wages paid on public holidays, but these wages would be subject to normal on-costs (such as superannuation).

Q. What happens with leave accruals while on JobKeeper?

A. If an employees’ hours have been varied in accordance with a JobKeeper Enabling Stand Down Direction, then their leave accrues at their ordinary pre-JobKeeper rates, even if their hours have been reduced or they have been stood down.

If their hours have changed due to an agreement between the employer and employee then leave accruals will depend on what was agreed between the employer and employee.

Q. If there are specific terms in an Award or Agreement in regard to exercising a stand down direction am I required to follow them?

A. No. If you are eligible to exercise a JobKeeper Direction you will not need to follow specific terms in an Award or Agreement in relation to that process (including the recent changes to some awards in this area).

Q. Can you make employees take Long Service Leave (LSL) during the JobKeeper period?

A. Yes – but the rules regarding requiring employees to take long service leave will vary from State to State. Please contact Employment Innovations for more information.

Q. When does JobKeeper Direction cease to apply?

A. Employers remaining within the JobKeeper scheme can continue to use JobKeeper Directions up until the 28 March 2021. Legacy employers will have access to a reduced set of JobKeeper Directions for the same period, so long as they satisfy a 10% turnover decline.

JobKeeper Payment resources

Employment Innovations | JobKeeper Enabling Directions letter templates

 

Government websites

Treasury.gov.au | JobKeeper Payment

Business.gov.au | JobKeeper Payment for employers and employees

Business.gov.au | JobKeeper Payment for sole traders

 

Government Fact Sheets

JobKeeper Payment | Frequently Asked Questions

JobKeeper Payment | Information for employers

JobKeeper Payment | Information for employees

JobKeeper Payment | Changes to the Fair Work Act

JobKeeper Payment | Protecting Integrity

 

Government Tools

You may choose to create your own employee nomination notice instead of using the JobKeeper employee nomination notice if it is not practical to have each employee complete and return the ATO version to you.

ato.gov.au | Creating your own employee nomination notice

 

Got further questions about JobKeeper Payment & Directions?

If you would like to understand whether your business can take advantage of the JobKeeper Payments, in addition to how they might impact your payroll – why not book a free 30 minute consultation with one of our Payroll experts?

 

Need JobKeeper Payroll Help? Book a free 30 minute 1:1 JobKeeper advisory session with a Payroll expert!

 

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Key dates for the JobKeeper scheme

 

30 March 2020First day of JobKeeper scheme
20 April 2020Enrolment in JobKeeper commences
8 May 2020Last day to make back payments to employees to be eligible from 30 March
31 May 2020Last day to enrol in JobKeeper from its commencement
31 August 2020Last day to make back payments to employees to be eligible from 3 August 2020 for the new 1 July eligibility test
27 September 2020Last day of JobKeeper 1.0 Payment scheme
28 September 2020JobKeeper Directions cease to apply for employers who do not satisfy a minimum 10% decline in turnover test
28 September 2020JobKeeper 2.0 Payment scheme commences
28 March 2021Last day of JobKeeper 2.0 Payment scheme

 


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About Employment Innovations

Employment Innovations is one of Australia’s leading providers of employment services designed to increase productivity and ensure compliance. Its services and solutions include all the tools that every Australian small to medium sized employer needs – including workplace advice, legal services, payroll solutions, migration, human resource management and HR software.

Disclaimer

The information provided in these knowledge base articles is general in nature and is not intended to substitute for professional advice. If you are unsure about how this information applies to your specific situation we recommend you contact Employment Innovations for advice.

 

The coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic will continue to change over the coming weeks and we recommend following the advice of State & Federal governments & health authorities. This article about the Government’s JobSeeker Payment was originally published on 1 April 2020 and last updated on 14 September 2020.

 

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